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Matches 101 to 150 of 1,236

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   Notes   Linked to 
101 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Bell, Gordon Bradley (I249)
 
102 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Caudle, Adrian Robert Jr. (I160)
 
103 1st Lt. J. T. Sweeney, one of the few survivors of the four-day confrontation, later recounted that they had superior arms than the Samarnons, but when they smelled kerosene from the bales of hemp piled around the rectory and, had the rectory caught fire itself from the burning bales of hemp, they (Americans) could have been roasted and charred alive inside the rectory. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siege_of_Catubig)

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The Battle of Catubig

Fought at the turn of the 20th century between the local militia of Catubig and a contingent of General Vicente Lukban's incipient Army of the Philippine-American war in Samar and Leyte on the one hand and the U.S. Regular Army on the other, the battle of Catubig (1) brought into focus two aspects of the combatants: raw courage and humanism on the part of the Samarnons, and the penchant of a vanquished, proud U. S. Army to hide the truth from the Filipinos.

Catubig used to be a small town some eighteen kilometers from the mouth of the deep, navigable Catubig River that empties into Lake Lao-ang in the northern section of what used to be the one-province island of Samar. Today, further inland, in the upper source of the river is another town, Las Navas, which regained or was granted its own municipal charter in 1948.

Before the last two decades of the Spanish rule in the Philippines, Las Navas was in fact the set of municipal government in the Catubig Valley. However, toward the close of the 19th century, Kagninipa (now Catubig) started to out-grow Las Navas. This is understandable inasmuch as Kagninipa is located right at the stretches of wide agricultural lands in the vortex of the rich rice-growing Catubig Valley, reputedly the rice granary of Samar. So, ecclesiastical authorities or the Roman Catholic Church built a strong stone church in Kagninipa in 1886. This edifice is stronger in construction and larger in size than the Church in Las Navas even to this day.

The two settlements themselves had a romanticized rivalry, especially when it became apparent that ecclesiastical authorities had its bent on Kagninipa. To avoid a violent confrontation to settle the issue as to where the permanent seat of government was to be located, the two rival chieftains, or capitanes at the time decided it will be a waste of human lives and ugly to fight employing armed men. Capitan Saro of Las Navas and Capitan Mecias of Kagninipa agreed to settle the conflict by staging a carabao bullfight one Sunday. Should the Las Navas bull win, Las Navas will keep the seat of government; should the Kagninipa bull win, the seat of government will, accordingly, be transferred to Kagninipa.

After exhaustive search for the best bulls, the two chieftains were ready to settle the issue. To cut a long story short, it was the bull from Kagninipa that decisively won, in fact chasing the Las Navas bull until it jumped into the Catubig River in fright and pain where it drowned from the wounds gorged in wildly by the strong horns of the more powerful Kagninipa bull.

Thus the seat of municipal government permanently moved to Kagninipa. This took place, however, not without any further enmity.

Then early in February 1900 some Americans started coming in trickle posing as private surveyors. The local church authorities were perceptively more friendly with the visitors than they were with the natives. But the “visitors” were also trying their best to be friendly with the natives. At one point, on a pleasant sunny morning, as two “surveyors” were strolling along Kagninipa Brook, one saw a cat sunbathing by rolling along the grassy edge of the brook. The Americans approached a young lady who was doing her laundry and asked, “What is that, cat?” The lass, hardly seeing the cat which was in higher elevation, and not knowing what the foreigners were asking about, responded, “Tubig,” meaning the water of the brook.

In a short while bystanders gathered around. And they started saying, at the bidding of the Americans, “Catubig!” The Americans thought that “tubig” means cat, and the Filipinos, yes, the Catubignons, thought on the other hand that “cat” means tubig. When this news reached Domingo Rebadulla, the most respected and admired citizen of Kagninipa at the time, he suggested that this “word-compact” or word of friendship be used henceforth as the new name of the town of Kagninipa to signify the friendliness of the Americans and the native populace. Hence, the name “Catubig” today.

In a matter of weeks the “surveyors”, apparently having understood and learned the psyche of the local populace, were already wearing military uniforms, and more men were pouring in, ferried by a gunboat. The priest had left, if temporarily, apparently at the bidding of the Americans, for his safety as well as to make room for the Americans to establish a garrison in the rectory or convent and in the adjacent stone church of Saint Joseph the Worker Parish.

The soldiers, as the surveyors finally turned out to be, were of Company H, 43rd Volunteer Infantry Regiment of the U.S. Army. Their real mission was two-fold. First, on the short term, to deny General Lukban access that year (1900) to the bounty rice harvest of the Catubig Valley. This harvest takes place, until now, during the month of April. Second, to deny the General, on the long-term, from making the lush and rice-rich Catubig Valley as the alternate if not permanent headquarters of the Army he was raising in Samar and Leyte for the Philippine Revolution, which had already metamorphosed into the Philippine-American War.

The people of Catubig naturally resented the deceptive presence of the Americans upon discovering the Americans' real intentions. The local leaders, hospitable as they customarily were to visitors, started a series of hurriedly-convened secret meetings.

Francisco Fincalero, the local real-estate and rice magnate and adoringly called Taga-ta by his associates, sent out instructions to his tenants that if the Americans commandeered his harvest, his tenants were to resist. Homobono Joli-Joli, a young man from Las Navas, forgot the past rivalry of Las Navas and Kagninipa and volunteered with 25 men, with himself at the head, to join the militia. Domingo Rebadulla, the acknowledged leader of Catubig during the Filipino American War and first mayor thereafter, was the over-all overseer in forming the local militia. Domingo, charismatic by personality, easily counted the assistance of Juan Alaras and Probo Plagata, men who later also became municipal mayors of Catubig.

The people responded quickly and favorably. A 300-man strong, fighting force was easily raised.

Knowing that the men were ill-trained and ill-equipped, well-off families—the Orsolinos, the Tafallas, the Mercaders, the Tentativas, the Turbanadas, etc.—donated their mousers and revolvers. Local blacksmiths worked overnights to make paltik (locally manufactured guns) and baids (the Samarnon’s counterpart of the Samurai blade).

Doubting the military know-how of the militiamen, Domingo Rebadulla dispatched a three-man courier party, overseen by his fourteen-year old son, Pedro, to make contact with General Lukban. The General responded by dispatching for a few days one of his deputies, Col. Enrique Villareal Dagujob, a college-educated native of Bicol. The colonel was to check the terrain of the possible battleground and to give secret military instructions to the militia.

General Lukban likewise assigned one of his chemists to the fighting men of Catubig to ensure that they had adequate and steady supply of gun power to recycle used cartridges.

Above all, the General assured the “boys” liaison that should hostilities break out, he will immediately reinforce the Catubig militia with at least 500 men.

The success of the “boys’ mission” was quickly apparent. Col. Villareal-Dagujob showed up in a few days incognito. The colonel found the morale of the town’s leadership and the fighting men unusually high. Leaving specific instructions as to what to do upon the start of hostilities, Col. Villareal-Dagujob returned to Blanca Aurora, in the highlands of the Gandara Valley, the headquarters of General Lukban.

Sensing immediate hostilities, the General deputized back Col. Villareal-Dagujob to head a 600-man raiding force. Just a day away of mostly jungle marching to Catubig, the raiding party learned that the Battle of Catubig had begun. The local leaders took advantage of the fact that the steamer Tonyik which had been ferrying supplies and men to Catubig was nowhere to be found in Lao-ang, the closest port. Informers reported it was in Calbayog, in the westside of the island of Samar. In the estimation of the leaders in Catubig, this means at least about three days before the garrison in Catubig could be reinforced or rescued in the event of hostilities.

It was a sunny April Sunday morning, typical of April, the rice harvest month in Catubig. The mayas were chirping their songs of joy in the abundance of rice grains, their favorite food, just in the outlying fields.

The date: April 15, 1900.

The longshoremen were piling abaca bales after bales in the street ready, as they appeared to be, for loading to a double-mast parao moored at the pier closeby where the American steamer had also been mooring. The giant out-triggered vessel was unloading earthen wares (pots, jars, etc.), but mostly 20-liter kerosene cans. The kerosene cans were, in the normal course of trade, being readied for delivery to consignees in town.

The belfry boys got their instructions before the fall of night, April 14. They usually were to ring one bell for the customary ringing at 6:00 A.M. on a Sunday of ordinary time. But for the following day they were to stay put and wait for a small-arm gunfire at which instance they were to ring in full blast all three bells, including the giant de ruida. This de ruida bell is rung only on solemn occasions, such as the arrivals of dignitaries, or at the inception and completion of a High Mass during town fiestas or special occasions, or in cases of calamities such as fires beyond control.

But Domingo Rebadulla objected to the small-arm gunfire, for it could in fact mean hostilities. He ordered instead dropping on the concrete street, with the appearance of casual fall from the head of a longshoreman, an empty kerosene can to produce the loud, sharp decibels that were to signal the American garrison did not accept the town leaders’ demand to surrender with their guns and military wares and to vacate the convent and the church vicinities.

At about 7:00 A.M., just before the Americans started their daily morning drills in small numbers, a courier was dispatched by the town capitan to hand in an envelope to the doorman at the rectory containing the demand. As anticipated the garrison turned the demand down. A thumb-down signal from the courier as he emerged from the rectory caused the fall of an empty kerosene can from a husky longshoreman while he was stacking kerosene cans not far from the town square. That sudden fall was the signal that the belfry boys were awaiting. A few bell rings sent the token force of militiamen at the rear of the convent firing to decoy the Americans in that direction.

At 7:30 A.M. all hell broke loose.

The bells of Catubig, especially the giant de ruida that day kept spinning in crescendo, the other two bells were tolling unusually fast. All able-bodied men ran toward the convent even without orders and volunteered to fight. But unarmed they instead ended up rolling the hemp bales around the convent to serve as shields to the militiamen.

At the indication that the Americans were forcing themselves out into their two small motorized boats, the militia, assisted by civilians, poured kerosene on the abaca bales and set them afire. Americans who dared to leave the convent were thus forced to negotiate their way through the towering inferno of abaca bales, then through the baids and guns of the militia. Fifteen of the 36 Americans perceived to be in the garrison tried to flee to safety, and fifteen burnt alive or were cut down by Catubignon fires or bolos to their bloody deaths.

But the Americans were shooting too and in higher volume of fires. After all they had better guns. Their bullets were proportionately taking higher tolls than those of the Samarnons’. Badly outnumbered, however, the American ceased firing. Yet their will to fight echoed in the halls of the U.S. Congress in Washington, D.C., later when one soldier, Cpl. Anthony J. Carson, of Boston, Massachusetts, was given the U.S. highest military award, the Congressional Medal of Honor, for his, according to the citation:

“Assuming command of a detachment of the company which had survived an overwhelming attack of the enemy, and by his bravery and untiring effort and the exercise of good judgment in the handling of his men successfully withstood for 2 days the attacks of a large force of the enemy, thereby saving the lives of the survivors and protecting the wounded until relief came.”

1st Lt. J. T. Sweeney, one of the few survivors of the four-day confrontation, later recounted that they had superior arms than the Samarnons, but when they smelled kerosene from the bales of hemp piled around the rectory and, had the rectory caught fire itself from the burning bales of hemp, they (Americans) could have been roasted and charred alive inside the rectory.

The Americans, however, did not easily surrender. It was discovered later that they were buying time for reinforcement or rescue to arrive. And they had dug trenches at the back of the convent (2).

Then early on the third day of the siege, the 600 men of General Lukban arrived. Intelligence report from General Lukban’s men revealed that American reinforcement or rescuers were steaming up the Catubig River from Lao-ang. The rescuers arrived in the town early on the fourth day, i.e., Wednesday, April 19, 1900.

A great battle immediately erupted after a lull of almost two days when only sporadic fires where heard. The bells of Saint Joseph Church did not stop ringing the entire morning of the final day of the Battle of Catubig. The Americans tried to take the bells by scaling the belfry. But they never succeeded for two reasons. First, they were getting killed in their attempt; second, the belfry of Saint Joseph Church was difficult to scale. It is mounted on the highest point of the church frame over the main facade, unlike other churches in Samar, as the one in Balangiga, where belfries are built detached from the church and lower in height.

Sensing disaster because it was trapped from two open sides of the Catubig River by militiamen in their dugouts—as people do now in peacetime during fluvial parades in celebration of Santo Niño—the steamer Tonyik, which ferried in the reinforcement from Lao-ang, suddenly pulled out. But it was chased by the militiamen and by some of General Lukban's men who captured two motorized smaller American boats.

Some two kilometers down the river, downstream toward Lao-ang, the steamer ran out of control due to heavy fires by some Lukban men who set a sentry at the Irawahan tributary river to the left of the main river. Those manning the steamer were so scared to death because they were also being chased by Catubignon militia and the Lukban men in the main river. The ill-fated Tonyik hit the sharply curving, rocky edge of the Catubig River at a hillside called Kalirukan (a local term for maelstrom because the water in that segment of the river is violent during high floods) and suddenly capsized and went down the deep water, lying on its left side and bringing seven soldiers to their watery graves.

The real estate immediately to the right side of this segment of the river, on the downstream direction toward Lao-ang, was then owned by—and still belongs today to the descendants of—Domingo Mercader (3). In fact the settlement that later sprang from the adjoining real estate is now called Bgy. Domingo Mercader.

After a week the American corps of engineers salvaged the sunken boat, but not without leaving some heavy items like some steel ballasts and anchors to the Mercader household as gratuity of battle and for having given humanitarian aid to the scared and distressed American survivors—with the consent of the Catubig militia and the Lukban men of course.

Cpl. Anthony J. Carson of Company H, 43rd Infantry Regiment (later awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor, as aforementioned), one of the survivors, openly admitted that the Battle of Catubig was a total defeat for the American forces.

On board another steamer that picked up the survivors of the capsized Tonyik, Lt. Sweeney, one of the survivors, was so thankful to his Maker for having survived.

The U.S. War Department recorded the event as “…the heaviest bloody encounter yet for the American troops” against the Filipino freedom fighters. This account is so intriguing. This seems to include those in Luzon!

The New York Times called the Battle of Catubig, “horrifying”.

The Americans recorded their casualties at 22, 19 dead and three wounded. But the Lukban forces believed there was a cover up by the Americans of their actual casualties. Other published accounts recorded 31 American deaths (4), which obviously included the fatalities when the Tonyik capsized, as well as those who jumped ship as it was speeding away from the thick of battle almost uncontrolled from the town of Catubig.

For example, Maria Marcader Lambino (5), then a 13-year old daughter of Domingo Mercader and an eyewitness to the battle, used to tell her grandchildren that one American soldier who jumped into the water, as the Tonyik was attempting to pull out, shouted, “Dinamat!” The American while swimming and cursing was hacked to death by a militia boloman who was in a dugout. A Lukban soldier could have shot the American point blank, but to conserve ammo he let a militiaman do the kill with his baid.

Maria’s grandchildren later interpreted dinamat as “god damn it”.

The Filipinos accounted 150 deaths of their own due in large measure to their exposed position when attacking the rectory.

Antonio Hipe (now deceased) (6), who was a clam diver, together with other clam divers, had recovered quite a heap more of steel ballasts that the corps of engineers, in salvaging the Tonyik, had left at the bottom of the waters in Kalirukan. However, local blacksmiths had made most of them into farm implements (7).

Conclusion. The Battle of Catubig is an overlooked glory of Filipinos in the Philippine-American war, some say. By the same token, this is attributed to the penchant of the U.S. military at that time for spiriting away immediately to Washington, D.C., any records of combat that gave the American side the appearance of ignominy and total defeat. Hence, Filipino historians doing research in the Philippines—and writing history books with what they had—were left without complete information. The Battle of Catubig had not appeared even in footnotes of Philippine history books.

__________

End notes: (1) The narratives in this article are in many cases drawn from the author’s own recollections of stories he avidly listened to—from eyewitnesses to the confrontation and who had no axe to grind—when he was growing up in his hometown of Catubig. The battle should thus be a subject for further research and study by serious students of history and public affairs.

The author wishes to acknowledge the suggestions of Dr. Romeo V. Cruz, UP professor of history (ret.), on how to proceed with the narratives that involve oral accounts of individuals who are eyewitnesses to historic events. Likewise, the author wishes to convey his gratitude to Prof. Cesar Torres, formerly of UP, for soliciting this article and for encouraging its completion.

(2) While growing up, the author used to play with other boys of his age inside the trenches.

(3) Domingo Mercader was the maternal great, great grandfather of the author.

(4) Editorial, Leyte Samar Daily Express, May 14, 2000.

(5) The author is one of Maria Mercader Lambino’s grandchildren.

(6) Antonio Hipe was the husband of the author’s aunt Lucia Mercader Lambino Hipe.

(7) This was as of April 1957 when the author left for Manila to pursue his college education.

Other Sources—see also end note (1), above: (1) U.S. War Department records on the Philippine insurrection, National Archives, Washington, D.C.

(2) Leyte Samar Daily Express, May 14, 2000.

(3) Elinando B. Cinco’s cyber article, April 2003.

http://gugma.samarnews.net/articles/article29.htm
By QUINTIN L. DOROQUEZ*
August 26, 2006

Fought at the turn of the 20th century—between the local militia of Catubig and a contingent of General Vicente Lukban’s incipient Army of the Philippine-American war in Samar and Leyte on the one hand and the U.S. Regular Army on the other—the battle of Catubig(1) brought into focus two aspects of the combatants: raw courage and humanism on the part of the Samarnons, and the penchant of a vanquished, proud U. S. Army to hide the truth from the Filipinos.

Catubig used to be a small town some eighteen kilometers from the mouth of the deep, navigable Catubig River that empties into Lake Lao-ang in the northern section of what used to be the one-province island of Samar. Today, further inland, in the upper source of the river is another town, Las Navas, which regained or was granted its own municipal charter in 1948.

Before the last two decades of the Spanish rule in the Philippines, Las Navas was in fact the set of municipal government in the Catubig Valley. However, toward the close of the 19th century, Kagninipa (now Catubig) started to out-grow Las Navas. This is understandable inasmuch as Kagninipa is located right at the stretches of wide agricultural lands in the vortex of the rich rice-growing Catubig Valley, reputedly the rice granary of Samar. So, ecclesiastical authorities or the Roman Catholic Church built a strong stone church in Kagninipa in 1886. This edifice is stronger in construction and larger in size than the Church in Las Navas even to this day.

The two settlements themselves had a romanticized rivalry, especially when it became apparent that ecclesiastical authorities had its bent on Kagninipa. To avoid a violent confrontation to settle the issue as to where the permanent seat of government was to be located, the two rival chieftains, or capitanes at the time decided it will be a waste of human lives and ugly to fight employing armed men. Capitan Saro of Las Navas and Capitan Mecias of Kagninipa agreed to settle the conflict by staging a carabao bullfight one Sunday. Should the Las Navas bull win, Las Navas will keep the seat of government; should the Kagninipa bull win, the seat of government will, accordingly, be transferred to Kagninipa.

After exhaustive search for the best bulls, the two chieftains were ready to settle the issue. To cut a long story short, it was the bull from Kagninipa that decisively won, in fact chasing the Las Navas bull until it jumped into the Catubig River in fright and pain where it drowned from the wounds gorged in wildly by the strong horns of the more powerful Kagninipa bull.

Thus the seat of municipal government permanently moved to Kagninipa. This took place, however, not without any further enmity.

Then early in February 1900 some Americans started coming in trickle posing as private surveyors. The local church authorities were perceptively more friendly with the visitors than they were with the natives. But the “visitors” were also trying their best to be friendly with the natives. At one point, on a pleasant sunny morning, as two “surveyors” were strolling along Kagninipa Brook, one saw a cat sunbathing by rolling along the grassy edge of the brook. The Americans approached a young lady who was doing her laundry and asked, “What is that, cat?” The lass, hardly seeing the cat which was in higher elevation, and not knowing what the foreigners were asking about, responded, “Tubig,” meaning the water of the brook.

In a short while bystanders gathered around. And they started saying, at the bidding of the Americans, “Catubig!” The Americans thought that “tubig” means cat, and the Filipinos, yes, the Catubignons, thought on the other hand that “cat” means tubig. When this news reached Domingo Rebadulla, the most respected and admired citizen of Kagninipa at the time, he suggested that this “word-compact” or word of friendship be used henceforth as the new name of the town of Kagninipa to signify the friendliness of the Americans and the native populace. Hence, the name “Catubig” today.

In a matter of weeks the “surveyors”, apparently having understood and learned the psyche of the local populace, were already wearing military uniforms, and more men were pouring in, ferried by a gunboat. The priest had left, if temporarily, apparently at the bidding of the Americans, for his safety as well as to make room for the Americans to establish a garrison in the rectory or convent and in the adjacent stone church of Saint Joseph the Worker Parish.

The soldiers, as the surveyors finally turned out to be, were of Company H, 43rd Volunteer Infantry Regiment of the U.S. Army. Their real mission was two-fold. First, on the short term, to deny General Lukban access that year (1900) to the bounty rice harvest of the Catubig Valley. This harvest takes place, until now, during the month of April. Second, to deny the General, on the long-term, from making the lush and rice-rich Catubig Valley as the alternate if not permanent headquarters of the Army he was raising in Samar and Leyte for the Philippine Revolution, which had already metamorphosed into the Philippine-American War.

The people of Catubig naturally resented the deceptive presence of the Americans upon discovering the Americans’ real intentions. The local leaders, hospitable as they customarily were to visitors, started a series of hurriedly-convened secret meetings.

Francisco Fincalero, the local real-estate and rice magnate and adoringly called Taga-ta by his associates, sent out instructions to his tenants that if the Americans commandeered his harvest, his tenants were to resist. Homobono Joli-Joli, a young man from Las Navas, forgot the past rivalry of Las Navas and Kagninipa and volunteered with 25 men, with himself at the head, to join the militia. Domingo Rebadulla, the acknowledged leader of Catubig during the Filipino American War and first mayor thereafter, was the over-all overseer in forming the local militia. Domingo, charismatic by personality, easily counted the assistance of Juan Alaras and Probo Plagata, men who later also became municipal mayors of Catubig.

The people responded quickly and favorably. A 300-man strong, fighting force was easily raised.

Knowing that the men were ill-trained and ill-equipped, well-off families—the Orsolinos, the Tafallas, the Mercaders, the Tentativas, the Turbanadas, etc.—donated their mousers and revolvers. Local blacksmiths worked overnights to make palteks (locally manufactured guns) and baids (the Samarnon’s counterpart of the Samurai blade).

Doubting the military know-how of the militiamen, Domingo Rebadulla dispatched a three-man courier party, overseen by his fourteen-year old son, Pedro, to make contact with General Lukban. The General responded by dispatching for a few days one of his deputies, Col. Enrique Villareal Dagujob, a college-educated native of Bicol. The colonel was to check the terrain of the possible battleground and to give secret military instructions to the militia.

General Lukban likewise assigned one of his chemists to the fighting men of Catubig to ensure that they had adequate and steady supply of gun powder to recycle used cartridges.

Above all, the General assured the “boys” liaison that should hostilities break out, he will immediately reinforce the Catubig militia with at least 500 men.

The success of the “boys’ mission” was quickly apparent. Col. Villareal-Dagujob showed up in a few days incognito. The colonel found the morale of the town’s leadership and the fighting men unusually high. Leaving specific instructions as to what to do upon the start of hostilities, Col. Villareal-Dagujob returned to Blanca Aurora, in the highlands of the Gandara Valley, the headquarters of General Lukban.

Sensing immediate hostilities, the General deputized back Col. Villareal-Dagujob to head a 600-man raiding force. Just a day away of mostly jungle marching to Catubig, the raiding party learned that the battle of Catubig had begun. The local leaders took advantage of the fact that the steamer Tonyik which had been ferrying supplies and men to Catubig was nowhere to be found in Lao-ang, the closest port. Informers reported it was in Calbayog, in the westside of the island of Samar. In the estimation of the leaders in Catubig, this means at least about three days before the garrison in Catubig could be reinforced or rescued in the event of hostilities.

It was a sunny April Sunday morning, typical of April, the rice harvest month in Catubig. The mayas were chirping their songs of joy in the abundance of rice grains, their favorite food, just in the outlying fields.

The date: April 15, 1900.

The longshoremen were piling abaca bales after bales in the street ready, as they appeared to be, for loading to a double-mast parao moored at the pier closeby where the American steamer had also been mooring. The giant out-triggered vessel was unloading earthen wares (pots, jars, etc.), but mostly 20-liter kerosene cans. The kerosene cans were, in the normal course of trade, being readied for delivery to consignees in town.

The belfry boys got their instructions before the fall of night, April 14. They usually were to ring one bell for the customary ringing at 6:00 A.M. on a Sunday of ordinary time. But for the following day they were to stay put and wait for a small-arm gunfire at which instance they were to ring in full blast all three bells, including the giant de ruida. This de ruida bell is rung only on solemn occasions, such as the arrivals of dignitaries, or at the inception and completion of a High Mass during town fiestas or special occasions, or in cases of calamities such as fires beyond control.

But Domingo Rebadulla objected to the small-arm gunfire, for it could in fact mean hostilities. He ordered instead dropping on the concrete street, with the appearance of casual fall from the head of a longshoreman, an empty kerosene can to produce the loud, sharp decibels that were to signal the American garrison did not accept the town leaders’ demand to surrender with their guns and military wares and to vacate the convent and the church vicinities.

At about 7:00 A.M., just before the Americans started their daily morning drills in small numbers, a courier was dispatched by the town capitan to hand in an envelope to the doorman at the rectory containing the demand. As anticipated the garrison turned the demand down. A thumb-down signal from the courier as he emerged from the rectory caused the fall of an empty kerosene can from a husky longshoreman while he was stacking kerosene cans not far from the town square. That sudden fall was the signal that the belfry boys were awaiting. A few bell rings sent the token force of militiamen at the rear of the convent firing to decoy the Americans in that direction.

At 7:30 A.M. all hell broke loose.

The bells of Catubig, especially the giant de ruida that day kept spinning in crescendo, the other two bells were tolling unusually fast. All able-bodied men ran toward the convent even without orders and volunteered to fight. But unarmed they instead ended up rolling the hemp bales around the convent to serve as shields to the militiamen.

At the indication that the Americans were forcing themselves out into their two small motorized boats, the militia, assisted by civilians, poured kerosene on the abaca bales and set them afire. Americans who dared to leave the convent were thus forced to negotiate their way through the towering inferno of abaca bales, then through the baids and guns of the militia. Fifteen of the 36 Americans perceived to be in the garrison tried to flee to safety, and fifteen burnt alive or were cut down by Catubignon fires or bolos to their bloody deaths.

But the Americans were shooting too and in higher volume of fires. After all they had better guns. Their bullets were proportionately taking higher tolls than those of the Samarnons’. Badly outnumbered, however, the American ceased firing. Yet their will to fight echoed in the halls of the U.S. Congress in Washington, D.C., later when one soldier, Cpl. Anthony J. Carson, of Boston, Massachusetts, was given the U.S. highest military award, the Congressional Medal of Honor, for his, according to the citation:

“Assuming command of a detachment of the company which had survived an overwhelming attack of the enemy, and by his bravery and untiring effort and the exercise of good judgment in the handling of his men successfully withstood for 2 days the attacks of a large force of the enemy, thereby saving the lives of the survivors and protecting the wounded until relief came.”

1st Lt. J. T. Sweeney, one of the few survivors of the four-day confrontation, later recounted that they had superior arms than the Samarnons, but when they smelled kerosene from the bales of hemp piled around the rectory and, had the rectory caught fire itself from the burning bales of hemp, they (Americans) could have been roasted and charred alive inside the rectory.

The Americans, however, did not easily surrender. It was discovered later that they were buying time for reinforcement or rescue to arrive. And they had dug trenches at the back of the convent(2).

Then early on the third day of the siege, the 600 men of General Lukban arrived. Intelligence report from General Lukban’s men revealed that American reinforcement or rescuers were steaming up the Catubig River from Lao-ang. The rescuers arrived in the town early on the fourth day, i.e., Wednesday, April 19, 1900.

A great battle immediately erupted after a lull of almost two days when only sporadic fires where heard. The bells of Saint Joseph Church did not stop ringing the entire morning of the final day of the battle of Catubig. The Americans tried to take the bells by scaling the belfry. But they never succeeded for two reasons. First, they were getting killed in their attempt; second, the belfry of Saint Joseph Church was difficult to scale. It is mounted on the highest point of the church frame over the main facade, unlike other churches in Samar, as the one in Balangiga, where belfries are built detached from the church and lower in height.

Sensing disaster because it was trapped from two open sides of the Catubig River by militiamen in their dugouts—as people do now in peacetime during fluvial parades in celebration of Santo Niño—the steamer Tonyik, which ferried in the reinforcement from Lao-ang, suddenly pulled out. But it was chased by the militiamen and by some of General Lukban’s men who captured two motorized smaller American boats.

Some two kilometers down the river, downstream toward Lao-ang, the steamer ran out of control due to heavy fires by some Lukban men who set a sentry at the Irawahan tributary river to the left of the main river. Those manning the steamer were so scared to death because they were also being chased by Catubignon militia and the Lukban men in the main river. The ill-fated Tonyik hit the sharply curving, rocky edge of the Catubig River at a hillside called Kalirukan (a local term for maelstrom because the water in that segment of the river is violent during high floods) and suddenly capsized and went down the deep water, lying on its left side and bringing seven soldiers to their watery graves.

The real estate immediately to the right side of this segment of the river, on the downstream direction toward Lao-ang, was then owned by—and still belongs today to the descendants of—Domingo Mercader(3). In fact the settlement that later sprang from the adjoining real estate is now called Bgy. Domingo Mercader.

After a week the American corps of engineers salvaged the sunken boat, but not without leaving some heavy items like some steel ballasts and anchors to the Mercader household as gratuity of battle and for having given humanitarian aid to the scared and distressed American survivors—with the consent of the Catubig militia and the Lukban men of course.

Cpl. Anthony J. Carson of Company H, 43rd Infantry Regiment (later awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor, as aforementioned), one of the survivors, openly admitted that the Battle of Catubig was a total defeat for the American forces.

On board another steamer that picked up the survivors of the capsized Tonyik, Lt. Sweeney, one of the survivors, was so thankful to his Maker for having survived.

The U.S. War Department recorded the event as “…the heaviest bloody encounter yet for the American troops” against the Filipino freedom fighters. This account is so intriguing. This seems to include those in Luzon!

The New York Times called the Battle of Catubig, “horrifying”.

The Americans recorded their casualties at 22, 19 dead and three wounded. But the Lukban forces believed there was a cover up by the Americans of their actual casualties. Other published accounts recorded 31 American deaths(4), which obviously included the fatalities when the Tonyik capsized, as well as those who jumped ship as it was speeding away from the thick of battle almost uncontrolled from the town of Catubig.

For example, Maria Mercader Lambino(5), then a 13-year old daughter of Domingo Mercader and an eyewitness to the battle, used to tell her grandchildren that one American soldier who jumped into the water, as the Tonyik was attempting to pull out, shouted, “Dinamat!” The American while swimming and cursing was hacked to death by a militia boloman who was in a dugout. A Lukban soldier could have shot the American point blank, but to conserve ammo he let a militiaman do the kill with his baid.

Maria’s grandchildren later interpreted dinamat as “god damn it”.

The Filipinos accounted 150 deaths of their own due in large measure to their exposed position when attacking the rectory.

Antonio Hipe (now deceased)(6), who was a clam diver, together with other clam divers, had recovered quite a heap more of steel ballasts that the corps of engineers, in salvaging the Tonyik, had left at the bottom of the waters in Kalirukan. However, local blacksmiths had made most of them into farm implements(7).

Conclusion. The battle of Catubig is an overlooked glory of Filipinos in the Philippine-American war, some say. By the same token, this is attributed to the penchant of the U.S. military at that time for spiriting away immediately to Washington, D.C., any records of combat that gave the American side the appearance of ignominy and total defeat. Hence, Filipino historians doing research in the Philippines—and writing history books with what they had—were left without complete information. The battle of Catubig had not appeared even in footnotes of Philippine history books.

+ + + + + + + + + +

End notes: (1)The narratives in this article are in many cases drawn from the author’s own recollections of stories he avidly listened to—from eyewitnesses to the confrontation and who had no axe to grind—when he was growing up in his hometown of Catubig. The battle should thus be a subject for further research and study by serious students of history and public affairs.

The author wishes to acknowledge the suggestions of Dr. Romeo V. Cruz, UP professor of history (ret.), on how to proceed with the narratives that involve oral accounts of individuals who are eyewitnesses to historic events. Likewise, the author wishes to convey his gratitude to Prof. Cesar Torres, formerly of UP, for soliciting this article and for encouraging its completion.

(2) While growing up, the author used to play with other boys of his age inside the trenches.

(3) Domingo Mercader was the maternal great, great grandfather of the author.

(4) Editorial, Leyte Samar Daily Express, May 14, 2000.

(5) The author is one of Maria Mercader Lambino’s grandchildren.

(6) Antonio Hipe was the husband of the author’s aunt Lucia Mercader Lambino Hipe.

(7) This was as of April 1957 when the author left for Manila to pursue his college education.

Other Sources—see also end note (1), above: (1) U.S. War Department records on the Philippine insurrection, National Archives, Washington, D.C.

(2) Leyte Samar Daily Express, May 14, 2000.

(3) Elinando B. Cinco’s cyber article, April 2003.

Born: April 23, 1869 at Boston, MA

Entered Service in the US Army from Malden, MA

Anthony Carson Earned The Medal of Honor During the Philippine Insurrection For heroism April 15 - 19, 1900 at Catubig, Samar, Philippine Islands

Died: April 25, 1943 at the age of 74
On April 15 Company H of the 43d Infantry was attacked at their garrison at Catubig on the island of Samar by hundreds of rebel guerrillas, creating a panic in the American ranks. The disorganized soldiers split into two ranks, fifteen of them running for the Catubig River bank where all were quickly killed. The surviving thirteen men, three of whom were wounded, reached the high grass behind a smoldering convent and dug in. Though only a corporal, Anthony Carson assumed command and rallied his men, leading them in successfully repulsing repeated enemy attacks on his beleaguered force for four days until reinforcements arrived. His heroic leadership and cool judgment in battle resulted in the saving of the lives of his men and protecting the wounded until Lieutenant J.T. Sweeney arrived two days later on the steamer Lao Aug. In the four-day siege as many as 150 enemy were killed by Corporal Carson and his small group of surrounded soldiers. (http://www.homeofheroes.com/gravesites/states/pages_af/carson_anthony_ma.html)
 
Sweeney, Joseph Thomas (I603)
 
104 2/1/2010 located a poor photograph of Mary Elizabeth Tyler (nee Self) from another researcher. The photograph is list as Mary Elizabeth and William Castle Harvell and is from the mid to late 1800's. She was married to an individual named Tayler, so I am unsure as to who Mr. Harvell is. I forwarded a message to the researcher who had the photograph with an inquiry for more information.

The 1860 USCensus confirmed she was married to Jacob Tyler and residing in Sabine Parish, Louisiana 14 Jun 1860.
The 1870 US Census confirmed she was married to Jacob Tyler and residing in Sabine Parish, Louisiana at Many 16 Jul 1870.
The 1880 US Census confirmed she was married to Jacob Tyler and residing in Ward 8 in Sabine Parish, Louisiana on 23 June 1880.
The 1900 US Census confirmed she was married to Jacob Tyler and residing in Sabine Parish, Louisiana, Little Bayou Scie, Ward 8 8 Jun 1900. 
Self, Mary Elizabeth (I848)
 
105 2/1/2010, a number of researchers have documented the Spade, Smoot families from Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana. I searched available data banks for grave sites for the Spade and Smoot families without success and sent an email inquiry to the Natchitoches Parish Genealogy group concerning the family name. Spade, Nancy W. (I778)
 
106 31. Nathan Bond, son of Abijah Bond was born March 31, 1752 and grad. Harvard, 1772. He was
a merchant in Boston, and died there January 5, 1816, aged 64. His remains were interred,
at his request by the side of his mother in Concord.

Insert: Bond's Watertown
p.64 Abijah Bond who m. July 6, 1749, Rebecca Patterson and settled in Concord, Mass.
their 2nd child, Nathan Bond b. Mar. 31, 1752; grad. Harvard, 1772; a merchant of Boston,
where all his children were born. In 1797, he moved to Portland, Maine and in 1803 he
returned to Boston where he died January, 1816. He m. June 1, 1783, Mrs. Joanna Doane b.
Aug 8, 1750 & d. Nov 3, 182_. Children:
1. Abijah Bond b. Feb 22, 1784; a member of Harvard Coll. 1-1/2 years, left and went
to sea and died in Trinadad 1803. His name was altered to William Abijah Bond.
2. Charles Bond b. June 7, 1785; d. Feb 2, 1786.
3. Nathan Bond b. June 6, 1786; d. Sept. 2, 1802.
4. Charles Bond twin to Nathan, b. June 6, 1786; merchant at Norfolk, VA; d. Sept. 22,
1822.
5. Royal Bond b. Sept 11, 1787; merchant of New York; drowned Aug 10, 1825 attempting
to cross the Connecticut River.
6. George Bond b. July 25, 1788; a distinguished merchant of the well-known firm of
Whitwell & Bond. He died in Philadelphia May 23, 1842; he m. Sept 9, 1810, Ann
Sigourney Hammett b. Jan 1, 1790. (seven children, listed)
7. Eliza Bond b. Feb 14, 1795; m. 1816, J. G. Pearson.

From [http://files.usgwarchives.net/ma/middlesex/towns/concord/histch16.txt] 
Bond, Nathan (I3610)
 
107 5 Jun 1917 Hayman Fountain registered for the military draft. His death is listed as 9 Feb 1919 so I am not sure if this was a result of World War I or not. He listed his occupation as farming with his father. From the records searched, it doesn't appear he married before his death at age 25. Fountain, Hyman (I2490)
 
108 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Patterson, Patrick Arthur (I240)
 
109 61st year. Brown, Abraham (I3154)
 
110 7/8/2007 requested death and marriage records from NYS Department of Health, Vital Records Department.

Abbie A. Fleischman b. circa 1882-1885 in New York State, was located in the 1910 and 1930 US Census. The 1910 census placed her with her father and mother, Martin and Catherine J. Fleischman residing at Kirkland Township, Oneida County, New York, and she was approximately 25 years of age at the time.

The 1930 US Census placed her at 112 Thomas Street, Utica, NY, Oneida County. She was listed as the head of household and was 48 years of age and an occupation listed as "sales lady." This census confirmed her father was born in Germany and her mother was born in Ireland. It is suspected from the records reviewed, that Abbie never married. A check of cemetery records in Oneida county will be done to determine if Abbie is buried in that area.

It is noted both census records spelled their last name FLEISCHMAN.

New York State death records will be searched for a death certificate of Abbie A. Fleishman.

Utica, New York Directories, 1887-91 Utica, New York Directories, 1887-91
Name: Abbie A. Fleischmann
Location 2: boards 135 Mohawk
Occupation: seamstress
Year: 1891
City: Utica
State: NY

Source Information:
Ancestry.com. Utica, New York Directories, 1887-91 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2000. Original data:

Utica City Directory, 1887. Utica, NY: Charles N. Gaffney, 1887.
Utica City Directory, 1888. Utica, NY: Charles N. Gaffney, 1888.
Utica City Directory, 1889. Utica, NY: Charles N. Gaffney, 1889.
Utica City Directory, 1890. Utica, NY: Charles N. Gaffney, 1890.
Utica City Directory, 1891. Utica, NY: J. E. Williams, 1891.
Description:
Directory listing of some residents of Utica, New York between 1887 and 1891

A George Fleischman was listed at the same address of Abbie Fleischman:

Utica, New York Directories, 1887-91 Utica, New York Directories, 1887-91
Name: George Fleischmann
Location 2: 135 Mohawk
Occupation: shoemaker
Year: 1891
City: Utica
State: NY

Source Information:
Ancestry.com. Utica, New York Directories, 1887-91 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2000. Original data:

Utica City Directory, 1887. Utica, NY: Charles N. Gaffney, 1887.
Utica City Directory, 1888. Utica, NY: Charles N. Gaffney, 1888.
Utica City Directory, 1889. Utica, NY: Charles N. Gaffney, 1889.
Utica City Directory, 1890. Utica, NY: Charles N. Gaffney, 1890.
Utica City Directory, 1891. Utica, NY: J. E. Williams, 1891.

Description:
Directory listing of some residents of Utica, New York between 1887 and 1891
 
Fleishman, Abbie A. (I305)
 
111 7/8/2007 requested death and marriage records from NYS Department of Health, Vital Records Department.

September 21, 2005 I received information from Sharon Casey (also researching the Fleishman name) that Mary Fleischman had entered the United States aboard the SS New York from Bremen, Germany May 19, 1871 accompanied by her brother Martin Fleischman who was 18 at the time. They entered through Castle Garden, New York (Ellis Island wasn't used until 1872). Martin was listed as a butcher by trade. Martin Fleshman was found in the 1880 census living in Kirkland, Oneida County an age 23 at the time. It appears he married a Irish woman by the name of Catherine and had one child by the name of Abbie A. Fleishman (b. circa 1889). Catherine Fleishman, Martin Fleischmann and Abbie were found in the 1900 census residing in Kirkland Township, Oneida County, New York. The census reflected she was born in Ireland. Martin was listed as a butcher. The 1910 Census confirmed their residence in Kirkland Township. Catherine Fleishman was found in the 1920 census at 1626 West Street, Utica, NY, age 60 at the time of the census. It appears that Martin was deceased as of that date and is believed to have passed away circa 1919.

Upon questioning, my mother remembered the name of Martin Fleishman being mentioned when she was a young girl.

The 1930 US Census listed Abbie A. Fleischman at 112 Thomas Street, Utica, NY, Oneida County. Her parents were presumably dead at that time. 
Nestor, Catherine J. (I304)
 
112 8/4/2009 Obituary for Joe Hill Lane requested from Shelby County Museum. Lane, Joe Hill (I479)
 
113 Consular Registration Certificates, compiled 1907–1918. ARC ID: 1244186. General Records of the Department of State, 1763–2002, Record Group 59. National Archives at Washington, D.C.

 
Source (S530)
 
114 Missouri Marriage Records. Jefferson City, MO, USA: Missouri State Archives. Microfilm. Source (S704)
 
115 School Student Lists. Worcester, Massachusetts: American Antiquarian Society. Source (S807)
 
116

"Pennsylvania, Philadelphia Marriage Index, 1885–1951." Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2009. Philadelphia County Pennsylvania Clerk of the Orphans' Court. "Pennsylvania, Philadelphia marriage license index, 1885-1951." Clerk of the Orphans’ Court, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

 
Source (S680)
 
117

"Wisconsin Births and Christenings, 1826–1926." Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2009, 2010. Index entries derived from digital copies of original and compiled records.

 
Source (S558)
 
118

Reports of the Deaths of American Citizens, compiled 01/1835-12/1974. Publication A1 566. ARC ID: 613857. Record Group 59. National Archives at College Park, Maryland, U.S.A.

Record of Death Notices of U.S. Citizens Aboard, 1835-1855. Publication A1 848, ARC ID: 1227672. Records of District Courts of the United States, RG 21. The National Archives at College Park, Maryland, U.S.A.

Notices of Deaths of U.S. Citizens Abroad, 1857-1922. Publication A1 849, ARC ID: 1227673. Records of District Courts of the United States, RG 21. The National Archives at College Park, Maryland, U.S.A.

 
Source (S669)
 
119

  • Vital Records of Bellingham Massachusetts to the Year 1850. Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1904.

  • Vital Records of Granville Massachusetts to the Year 1850. Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1914.

  • Vital Records of Lawrence Massachusetts to the Year 1850. Salem, MA: Essex Institute, 1926.

  • Vital Records of Lincoln Massachusetts to the Year 1850. Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1908.

  • Vital Records of Richmond Massachusetts to the Year1850. Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1913.

  • Vital Records of Shirley Massachusetts to the Year 1850. Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1918.

  • New England Historic Genealogical Society. Vital Records of Chelmsford Massachusetts to the Year 1849. Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1914.

     
  • Source (S665)
     
    120

    • Ohio. Division of Vital Statistics. Death Certificates and Index, December 20, 1908-December 31, 1953. State Archives Series 3094. Ohio Historical Society, Ohio.
    • Ohio Department of Health. Index to Annual Deaths, 1958-2002. Ohio Department of Health, State Vital Statistics Unit, Columbus, OH, USA.
     
    Source (S544)
     
    121

    Illinois, Cook County Deaths 1878–1922.” Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2010. Illinois Department of Public Health. “Birth and Death Records, 1916–present." Division of Vital Records, Springfield, Illinois.

     
    Source (S549)
     
    122

    Texas Department of State Health Services. Texas Death Certificates, 1903–1982. iArchives, Orem, Utah.

     
    Source (S628)
     
    123

    United States Senate.The Pension Roll of 1835.4 vols. 1968 Reprint, with index. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1992.

     
    Source (S654)
     
    124
    • 1855 Kansas Territory Census. Microfilm reel K-1. Kansas State Historical Society.
    • 1856, 1857, and 1858 Kansas Territory Censuses. Microfilm reel K-1. Kansas State Historical Society.
    • 1859 Kansas Territory Census. Microfilm reel K-1. Kansas State Historical Society.
    • 1865 Kansas State Census. Microfilm reels K-1 – K-8. Kansas State Historical Society.
    • 1875 Kansas State Census. Microfilm reels K-1 – K-20. Kansas State Historical Society.
    • 1885 Kansas State Census. Microfilm reels K-1 – K-146. Kansas State Historical Society.
    • 1895 Kansas State Census. Microfilm reels K-1 – K-169. Kansas State Historical Society.
    • 1905 Kansas State Census. Microfilm reels K-1 - K-181. Kansas State Historical Society.
    • 1915 Kansas State Census. Microfilm reels K-1 – K-271. Kansas State Historical Society.
    • 1925 Kansas State Census. Microfilm reels K-1 – K-177. Kansas State Historical Society.
     
    Source (S777)
     
    125
    • Archives of Ontario. Registrations of Deaths, 1869-1938. MS 935, reels 1-615. Archives of Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    • Archives of Ontario. Registrations of Ontario Overseas Deaths, 1939-1947. MS 944, reels 1-11. Archives of Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    • Archives of Ontario. Division Registrar Vital Statistics Records, 1858-1930. MS 940, reels 5-10, 16, 21, 26-27. Archives of Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
     
    Source (S553)
     
    126
    • Kentucky. Kentucky Birth, Marriage and Death Records – Microfilm (1852-1910). Microfilm rolls #994027-994058. Kentucky Department for Libraries and Archives, Frankfort, Kentucky.
    • Kentucky. Birth and Death Records: Covington, Lexington, Louisville, and Newport – Microfilm (before 1911). Microfilm rolls #7007125-7007131, 7011804-7011813, 7012974-7013570, 7015456-7015462. Kentucky Department for Libraries and Archives, Frankfort, Kentucky.
    • Kentucky. Vital Statistics Original Death Certificates – Microfilm (1911-1955). Microfilm rolls #7016130-7041803. Kentucky Department for Libraries and Archives, Frankfort, Kentucky.
     
    Source (S620)
     
    127
    • Nevada State Health Division, Office of Vital Records. Nevada Marriage Index, 1966-2005. Carson City, Nevada: Nevada State Health Division, Office of Vital Records.
    • Clark County, Nevada Marriage Bureau. Clark County, Nevada Marriage Index, 1956-1966. Las Vegas, Nevada: Clark County, Nevada Marriage Bureau.
     
    Source (S634)
     
    128 A last will and testament of Marinda Marean was executed in, Owego, New York, 29 Jan 1883 and probated in Tioga County Surrogate's Court, Owego, NY. Copies of the probate record, including the will, was received 24 Jan 2012.

    Last Will and Testament mentined sold at auction were items belonging to Col. Asa Camp.

    List of New York State Historic Markers in Tioga County, New York
    CAMPVILLE -On Nys 17C About 6 Miles East Od Village Of Owego --Owego, Town Of, New York -- Named In Honor Of Col. Asa Camp Revolutionary Soldier Who Settled Here In 1800 & Conducted 1St Tavern
    (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_New_York_State_Historic_Markers_in_Tioga_County,_New_York)

    Inquiry with the Owego Historian 26 Jan 2012:

    I was attempting to get in touch with Ms. Emma M. Sedore, Owego Town Historian.

    I was recently researching my ancestors from Owego, NY. I retrieved a Last Will and Testament of of my 2nd great-grandmother Marinda (Camp) Marean, b. 1817, d. 27 Jan 1883 in Owego, NY. Marinda was married to Simeon Marean and it looks as if they lived their entire lives in the Owego, NY area. The couple had three sons, James, George and Mark. Mark was my great-grandfather. What caught my attention in the probate record of the will was the fact that certain items were sold at public auction, some belonging to a Col. Asa Camp. In looking at some of your information on-line, it seems that Campville, NY was named after Col. Camp. In that Marinda's maiden name was "Camp" I was inquiring if you had any genealogy on the Camp family in the Owego area? I do not have any information on Marinda's family beyond her marriage to Simeon. I would be more than happy to share any information I have on the family that may be of interest to you.

    My great-grandfather Mark Marean (b. 06 Feb 1836 at Campville, NY; d. 15 Aug 1899 at Port Townsend, Washington) was originally a railroad engineer in the Owego, Binghamton, Elmira, and Buffalo area. Apparently he was injured in a engine explosion (I don't know when) near Binghamton and later returned to work on the railroad as a conductor. His 3rd marriage was to my great-grandmother, Margaret Looney from Elmira. His second marriage was to a Maggie Bayette, whose father Moran Bayette and his brother Morat operated a cigar manufacturing operation in Owego, Syracuse and Elmira in the 1880s (Bayette Brother's Cigars).

    Owego Gazette
    Aug. 19, 1899

    "A telegram was received this morning from Seattle, WA saying that Mark Marean, a former resident of this village is dead in that city. He was for many years an Erie Rr engineer. He was injured at Binghamton by the explosion of the boiler of his locomotive and upon his recovery was made a conductor. He went west about 10 years ago and had been a conductor there ever since. He was a member of Friendship Lodge F and A M of Owego. His age was about 62. He was the brother of James Marean of this village and George Marean of Foster."

    Mark Mareane's first marriage was to an Adelaide Manning of Owego. She and her children died before 1880. Mark and his third wife were living in Seattle, Washington when it was still a territory when he was injured in a construction accident and died approximately 3 days later in 1899. His wife Margaret Looney Mareane died in Seattle approximately 6 months later, and their children were sent back to Elmira, NY where they were raised by relatives. One of those children was my maternal grandmother, Carolyne Adelle (Marean) Marks. Mark was a descendant from Thomas Marean who was a Revolutionary War Soldier and helped settle Broome County following the Revolutionary War.

    I am working on a manuscript of the family history that I would be happy to share with you if you are interested, but any information you have on the Camp family could be of assistance to me.

    Patrick Arthur Patterson
    Southern Shores, NC
    ppatterson53@charter.net
    252-715-0351 
    Camp, Marinda (I556)
     
    129 A newspaper advertisement for a run-a-way slave: Mr. William Bateman, in the "Grand Gulf Advertiser," Dec. 7, 1838. "Ranaway William, scar over his left eye, one between his eye brows, one on his breast, and his right leg has been broken." (http://genealogytrails.com/main/slaveadverts.html).

    The Bateman family has graves in the Patterson Family Cemetery near Ivey, Georgia.

    Eliza Jerusha Patterson, born July 11, 1854 in Union County, Georgia; died July 24,1901 in Gordon, Ga; married William Thomas Bateman.
    http://wespatterson.com/patt/reunion2004/Elijah.L.Patterson.ancestors.report.pdf
     
    Bateman, William Thomas (I1454)
     
    130 Abany Cemetery, Nemaha, KS Dean, Sanford B. (I3270)
     
    131 Abigail Cary Abbe

    Birth: unknown
    Windham County
    Connecticut, USA
    Death: unknown
    Windham County
    Connecticut, USA

    From the book published in 1916 "Abbe -Abbey Genealogy In Memory of John Abbe and his Descendants" by Cleveland Abbe and Joseph Genung Nichols

    EBENEZER ABBE, JR., son of Ebenezer and Mary (Allen) Abbe, born July 27, 1708; resided in Windham or North Windham, Conn.

    Married February 22, 1729-30, ABIGAIL CARY, probably daughter of Joseph Cary, jr.

    One account gives her name Abigail Soale and still another says she was Abigail Goodale, daughter of Isaac Goodale of Salem.

    Children, baptized at Windham

    1 - Mary Abbe, b. March 26, 1731.

    2 - Isaac Abbe, b. July 25, 1733; m. Eunice Church.

    3 - Ezekiel Abbe, bapt. at Windham, July 27, 1735. Perhaps he was the Ezekiel Abbe who served during the French and Indian War : April 21-Dec. 2, 1755, in 3d Company, 2d Regiment, Major Isaac Foote ; June 8-Oct. 3, 1756, in 3d Company, 2d Regiment, Major Jehosaphat Starr; 16 days in militia company under Captain John Carpenter, Aug., 1757.

    4 - Abner Abbe, b. Aug. 26, 1737. This is probably the Abner Abbe who enlisted June 8, 1756, in 2d Regiment, 3d Company, Major Jehosaphat Starr ; d. or was captured Sept. 19, 1756.

    5 - Ebenezer Abbe, 3d, b. June 10, 1739. Perhaps the Ebenezer Abbe in Captain Benjamin Whitney's Company at Guilford and other parts of Windham County,1783-4.

    6 - Jacob Abbe, b. Aug. 23, 1741 ; m. Sarah Richardson.

    7 - John Abbe, b. Aug. 22, 1743 ; probably m. Abial Averill.

    8 - Samuel Abbe, b. June 21, 1747.

    Family links:
    Spouse:
    Ebenzer Abbe (1708 - ____)*

    *Calculated relationship

    Burial:
    Unknown

    Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]

    Created by: Marie
    Record added: Jan 18, 2012
    Find A Grave Memorial# 83644534 
    Goodale, Abigail (I994)
     
    132 Abigale Marks is buried in a family plot in a Roman Catholic Cemetery in Oneonta, New York. Eugenia Kelly recalled (5/95) going to her funeral and the internment in Oneonta. She remembered that her father was quite upset that one of the gravestones names had worn off. He went to the cemetery Director's office and demanded that the stone be replaced, which it was. The site was to be cared for perpetually. [Brøderbund Family Archive #110, Vol. 1, Ed. 3, Social Security Records: U.S., SS Death Benefit Records, Surnames Beginning with A, Date of Import: Jun 24, 1996, Internal Ref. #1.111.3.3726.98]

    Individual: Abbey, Abigail
    Birth date: Jul 9, 1886
    Death date: Dec 1973
    Social Security #: 110-38-3415
    Last residence: NY 14610
    State of issue: NY

    1920 United States Federal Census 1920 United States Federal Census
    Name: Abigail A Abbey
    Home in 1920: Rochester Ward 13, Monroe, New York
    Age: 33 years
    Estimated birth year: abt 1887
    Birthplace: New York
    Relation to Head of House: Wife
    Spouse's name: Chauncey W
    Father's Birth Place: New York
    Mother's Birth Place: New York
    Marital Status: Married
    Race: White
    Sex: Female
    Able to read: Yes
    Able to Write: Yes
    Image: 1078
    Neighbors: View others on page
    Household Members: Name Age
    Chauncey W Abbey 40
    Abigail A Abbey 33
    Walter Abbey 16
    Robert Abbey 7
    Arthur Abbey 5
    Edward Abbey 1 4/12
    Emmett J Dunn 39

    Source Citation: Year: 1920;Census Place: Rochester Ward 13, Monroe, New York; Roll: T625_1120; Page: 6B; Enumeration District: 150; Image: 1078.

    Source Information:
    Ancestry.com. 1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2005. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA.

    Note: Enumeration Districts 819-839 on roll 323 (Chicago City. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Fourteenth Census of the United States, 1920. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1920. T625, 2,076 rolls.

    The grave of John Walter Abbey and his mother Abbigail Agnes Abbey were moved from St. Mary's Cemetery to Mt. Calvery Cemetery in Oneonta, NY. The older cemetery was sold to make room for a parking lot, and all of the gaves and markers were moved to Mt. Calvery. Both were buried next to Abby's father and mother, John Joseph Marks and Mary Ann Fleischmann. As of 10 July 2010, the headstones are in good condidition and well cared for. Abbigayle and her son's stones are flat and somewhat covered by grass. John Walter died one year to the day after his mother.
     
    Marks, Abigail Agnes (I245)
     
    133 According to Francis Jackson, (1854), A History of the Early Settlement of Newton, County of Middlesex, Massachusetts, from 1639-1800. Boston, Stacy & Richardson, Elizabeth was the daughter of Capt. William Hammond, p 263.

    Buried next to her husband Joshua Marean in the Old East Parish Burying Ground, Middlesex Co. MA.

    Find-a-Grave Notation:
    Birth: 1769
    Death: Nov. 14, 1856

    Note: Age: 87 Spouse: Joshua Marean (d. 1846)

    Burial:
    East Parish Burying Ground
    Newton
    Middlesex County
    Massachusetts, USA
    Plot: Plot 1268

    Created by: Jim Sanders
    Record added: Jan 21, 2003
    Find A Grave Memorial# 7104275 
    Hammond, Elizabeth (I3065)
     
    134 According to Francis Jackson, (1854), A History of the Early Settlement of Newton, County of Middlesex, Massachusetts, from 1639-1800. Boston, Stacy & Richardson, John Marean was a Lieut of the Co. of Minute Men in the Battle of Concord, and signed the roll of the day's work as the Lieut commanding, and sworn to before Judge Fuller.
     
    Marean, John (I3042)
     
    135 ADA SILVERMAN born July 4, 1900 and died April 27, 1989.
     
    Silverman, Ada (I569)
     
    136 Adams, Andrew N. A Genealogical History of Robert Adams of Newbury, Mass. And His Descendants 1635 - 1900. Rutland, Vermont: Rober N. Adams, 1900. Source (S567)
     
    137 Adelaide is found in the 1915 US Census living in Webster, Iowa. It can be assumed her mother died in Syracuse shortly after the 1910 census. Bayett, Adelaide R. (I730)
     
    138 Age at Death: 100 Ingersoll, Harry Ray (I1665)
     
    139 Age at Death: 58 Cabell, Edward Carrington (I3503)
     
    140 Age at Death: 74 Patterson, Sidney Lee "Sid" (I1187)
     
    141 Age at Death: 82 Marean, Edith (I890)
     
    142 Age at Death: 89, Married Myott Matson, Marion Iva (I3530)
     
    143 Age at Death: 96 Stoddard, *Sarah (I3102)
     
    144 Age: 0 Patterson, Mary (I1113)
     
    145 Age: 0 Woodbridge, William (I2115)
     
    146 Age: 0 Marean, Hannah (I3054)
     
    147 Age: 0 Gates, Sumner (I3254)
     
    148 Age: 28 Livermore, Mary (I3070)
     
    149 Age: 43 Wilcox, Anna Maria (I3506)
     
    150 Age: 56 Weller, Stuart (I2873)
     

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